Blog Ipsa Loquitur

via Morehead State:

  • Name and define the Fundamental Rules of Arithmetic.

  • A wagon box is 2 ft. deep, 10 feet long, and 3 ft. wide. How many bushels of wheat will it hold?

  • If a load of wheat weighs 3942 lbs., what is it worth at 50 cts. per bu., deducting 1050 lbs. for tare?

  • District No. 33 has a valuation of $35,000. What is the necessary levy to carry on a school seven months at $50 per month, and have $104 for incidentals?

  • Find cost of 6720 lbs. coal at $6.00 per ton.

  • Find the interest of $512.60 for 8 months and 18 days at 7 percent.

  • What is the cost of 40 boards 12 inches wide and 16 ft. long at $20 per m?

  • Find bank discount on $300 for 90 days (no grace) at 10 percent.

  • What is the cost of a square farm at $15 per are, the distance around which is 640 rods?

  • Write a Bank Check, a Promissory Note, and a Receipt.

This is just one of five subjects.  I think I could keep up with the curve on most of these things. Theoretically.

Filed on under Irreverently Irrelevant

Last February, I wrote about one Mr. and Mrs. Boring, who were suing Google for including a photo of their house on Google Maps. From Ye Archives:

Google did this as part of its Google Street View service, which takes pictures of streets and puts them on the internet in a huge searchable database. For instance, here’s a picture of my law school.

The Borings do have a valid point in asking that the pictures of their property be removed from Google Street View. Their house sits on its own road, which is also apparently their driveway, and is marked “private.” Yet the Google Street View images let you see their driveway/private road, and now people can see the pool and houses that were already visible from the satellite maps.

The $25,000 question remains, though: who cares? I’d never heard of the Borings, and neither had you, Dear Reader. I suppose it’s possible that someday they could have upset someone who could use Google Street View to examine the Boring property. But that same person could just drive over to the Boring property and snoop about anyway: there’s no fence, no gate, and nothing but a sign marked “private.” Google hasn’t invaded the Borings’ privacy, just shown how superficial any expectation was.

The judge in this case has thrown out the lawsuit, although I think the Borings had a valid claim for trespassing if Google’s employees had set foot on the Borings’ property. It’s not necessary to cause any damage to someone’s property to be liable for trespassing…

The lawsuit was by and large without merit for the same reason that other prior lawsuits relating to Google Street View were unsuccessful: you haven’t lost any privacy simply because your house is visible from the sidewalk.  No one has invaded your home because you left your curtains open and people can see your cat

Well, the Borings won. $1. (In a recession, no less. That’s not even enough to buy a £1 cup of coffee.)

Filed on under The News

via Mac Rumors.

Verizon Wireless today announced that it will be launching the first large-scale LTE (4G) cellular network on Sunday, December 5th, bringing service to 38 metropolitan areas and 60 airports in the United States. The network is launching with only broadband data plans for USB modems, as handsets utilizing the technology are not expected until mid-2011.

Now, when you guys say “launching” …

Filed on under The News

The New Yorker’s Jeffrey Toobin on Bush v. Gore as we approach the tenth anniversary of the decision:

Momentous Supreme Court cases tend to move quickly into the slipstream of the Court’s history. In the first ten years after Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 decision that ended the doctrine of separate but equal in public education, the Justices cited the case more than twenty-five times. In the ten years after Roe v. Wade, the abortion-rights decision of 1973, there were more than sixty-five references to that landmark.

This month marks ten years since the Court, by a vote of five-to-four, terminated the election of 2000 and delivered the Presidency to George W. Bush. Over that decade, the Justices have provided a verdict of sorts on Bush v. Gore by the number of times they have cited it: zero.

The New Yorker, via Clusterflock.

Filed on under Legal Theory

Wikileaks posted more documents yesterday, this time, over 250,000 messages sent to and from American embassies. Last time, the big story was that the American government knew it had killed thousands of Iraqi civilians. This time, Daniel Drezner says that the big story is that there’s no big story:

There are no Big Lies. Indeed, Blake Hounshell’s original tweet holds: “the U.S. is remarkably consistent in what it says publicly and privately.” Assange – and his source for all of this, Bradley Manning – seem to think that these documents will expose American perfidy. Based on the initial round of reactions, they’re in for a world of disappointment.

Oh, sure, there are small lies and lies of omission – Bob Gates probably didn’t mention to Dmitri Medvedev or Vladimir Putin that “Russian democracy has disappeared.” Still, I’m not entirely sure how either world politics or American interests would be improved if Gates had been that blunt in Moscow.

If this kind of official hypocrisy is really the good stuff, then there is no really good stuff. U.S. officials don’t always perfectly advocate for human rights? Not even the most naive human rights activist would believe otherwise. American diplomats are advancing U.S. commercial interests? American officials have been doing that since the beginning of the Republic. American diplomats help out their friends? Yeah, that’s called being human. I’m willing to be convinced otherwise, but it strikes me that these leaks show other governments engaged in far more hypocritical behavior.

via Daniel W. Drezner at Foreign Policy.

Filed on under The News